Monday, August 7, 2017

On the Road as a Coach

bob on vacation
Whether we hit the open road, or the open skies, travel can be a big part of our personal and professional lives.
From visiting family to attending industry conferences to just exploring a new country or continent just to see more of our amazing world, it's inevitable that travel will be a part of our lives at some point.
view from airplaneHowever, travel brings with it a whole host of fitness related issues such as how to best handle jet lag, options for good nutrition, and places to train. As coaches, we can be very good about creating a travel plan for success for our clients, but we are often not so diligent about implementing, or even creating, such plans in our own lives.

What About Food?

Nutrition is often the easiest one for us to deal with, in part due to our knowledge of good nutrition, as with the exponential growth of vegetarians and vegans globally. This trend means that there are myriad of options for healthy and balanced meals/foods around the world, even in meat-obsessed places such as Spain and Poland.
One of my favorite things to do on the road is to find a local farmer’s market for a nice selection of fresh fruits, vegetables, and fish that I can’t always get back home. In the rare cases where there isn’t one, or if I’m too lazy to go, I simply opt for the local grocery store to pick up nutritious foods that I can have on hand. You can also pack an extra bag of your favorite snacks to bring along on your journey if shopping is not on your vacation’s to do list.
We can also opt for healthier options on the menu of restaurants, such as choosing baked instead of fried meals, or forgoing the ritual drowning of our pasta and salad in sauces, dressings, and oils. We can select water instead of juices and sodas, and leave the extra packet of sugar for our post meal tea or coffee on the table.

Places to Train

When it comes to working out, we, just like our clients, can be lost if we don’t have a plan going in. Michael Granger, a tier 3+ trainer at Equinox and a black belt in karate, shares his plan for success:
hotel“As for working on the road: it is all dependent on the type of travel. If I travel for karate {competitions} then I am always practicing utilizing the space I am in or that is available.
If it is for leisure, then it is dependent on the locale. In Cape Cod, I joined a gym for a week. In Guyana, I exchange coaching tips for gym access. Otherwise I do my mobility circuit and in place karate moves.”
Even if we aren’t a black belt in karate like Michael, we can get some free passes to, or join a local gym for our stay. There is also my favorite option, TRX workouts, since the TRX is light and easy to carry.

Your Turn

Fellow coaches, we need to remember to take care of ourselves on the road, so that we can continue to change the lives of our clients, families, and friends.
Questions? Have a travel hack you want to share? Leave a comment below.
(This article first appeared on ptonthenet.com)


Monday, January 23, 2017

How to Master Stress and Gain Control of Your Life and Body

Stress is an inevitable part of life, part of our shared human experience. At some point in our lives, we have all had, or have known someone who has had to deal with such stressors as severe illness, a difficult boss, car accident, delayed travel, and myriad other stressful situations.

However, our responses to stress are not inevitable. Think back to the person you know that can handle any crisis with the patience and serenity of Iyov (Job), or alternatively, the person that seems to wither under even the slightest amount of pressure. 

Our ability, or inability, to handle stress is based on our resilience, which Precision Nutrition defines as "..the ability to bounce back from a challenge." 

Our physical body, emotions, attitudes, beliefs, environment, and even our worldview influence our resilience and therefore our ability to deal with, adapt to, and recover from stress. Resilience is therefore a skill and mindset that we can learn and improve in order to improve the quality of our lives and bodies.  

"When we have physical, mental, and emotional resilience, we feel in control of our lives and our bodies." (PN Level 2 Certification Program)

Check out the resilience web below to determine where you stack up:

Resilience Web / courtesy Precision Nutrition

How did you measure up? If your resilience is not where it should be or where you want it to be, you can try the following two habits to help improve your resilience:

1. Meditate. Carve out five minutes from your day to just sit and meditate. Whether you chant ohm, woosah, or just focus on your breathing, this daily habit will help decrease the physiological effects of stress and thereby improve your resilience. 

2. Be grateful. Observant Jews start each day with the Modeh Ani, thanking Hashem for another day. Whether you believe in a higher power or not, there are numerous people/things/events to be grateful for, such as our lives, families, friends, sunsets, beach vacations, and more. Reflect upon, and/or chronicle these in a gratitude journal to increase the positive nature of your thinking. 

Questions? Comments? Please feel free to post them here, or reach out to us at info@bobwellsfitness.com with more questions, or for more information on how to work with one of our coaches to improve your resilience and gain control of your life and body.